French Fashion Pochoirs

French Fashion Pochoirs

French Fashion Pochoirs

La Gazette du Bon Ton [ Journal of Good Taste] was a leading French fashion magazine that was published from  1912 to 1925. It covered the latest developments in fashion, lifestyle, and beauty and presented  an elitist image to distinguish itself from its many competitors. It was available only to subscribers . The magazine signed exclusive contracts with seven of Paris's top couture houses – Madeleine Chéruit, Georges Doeuillet, Jacques Doucet, Jeanne Paquin, Paul Poiret, Redfern & Sons, and Charles Worth – so that the designers' fashions were shown only in the pages of the Gazette.The centerpiece of the Gazette was its fashion illustrations with each issue featuring  ten full-page fashion plates printed with the colour pochoir technique, employing many of the most famous Art Deco artists and illustrators of the day, including Georges Barbier, Erté, Pierre Brissaud et al who depicted the models in various dramatic and narrative situations.

‘La Guirlande’ was a fashion magazine printed between 1919 and 1920 in competition to Gazette du Bon Ton but not as popular and ceased to publish after only 800 issues.

‘Costume Parisiens’ was a magazine similar to the Gazette du Bon Ton, and was published from 1912 to 1914.

 

Stencil or pochoir technique was popular as a method of book illustration, and  was at its height of popularity in France during the 1920s. In the Pochoir process, a print with the outlines of the design was produced, and a series of stencils were used to apply colour by hand.  Pochoir was frequently used to create prints of intense colour, and is most often associated with Art Nouveau and Art Deco design.